21 January 2010 Romania and Bulgaria are the two skiing destination where holidaymakers’ budgets will go furthest, according to the Post Office Travel Services Ski Resort Report 2009, which surveyed 14 ski resorts across Europe and North America.

The cost of skiing in Europe on the whole is one the rise, but Eastern Europe continues to offer excellent value, particularly for beginner and intermediate skiers and families on a tight budget, according to the report, which investigated the total costs of six days’ skiing – including ski pass, ski hire, meals, and drinks.

The survey found the Poiana Brasov resort in Romania as the best value-for-money destination, with the total costs of six days’ skiing coming to £195.76 (around 225 euro) per person. The natural setting of country’s most popular resorts, according to the publication, “has been compared to Chamonix, France and Cortina D’Ampezzo, Italy.” It warns that advanced skiers may find the pistes limiting, but points to the fact there are also nine kilometres of cross-country trails to explore and wide open pistes for beginners.

The second most affordable ski resort, according to the Post Office survey, is Borovets in Bulgaria, with the total costs for six days’ skiing amounting to £250.87 (around 290 euro) per person.

“Bulgaria offers great skiing possibilities in its resorts, especially for beginners or people still finding their feet on the piste. Excellent value for money and superb après ski for adults and children make it a great family destination,” Marion Telsnig from TUI Travel told the publication.

As Bulgaria’s oldest and largest ski resort, set at 1,300 metres in the Rila Mountains, Borovets is ideal for intermediates and beginners, although it is considered somewhat limited for expert skiers, Post Office wrote.

In addition to its attractive 58 kilometres of pistes, the publication noted that the resort offers a good choice of inexpensive, cheerful bars, pubs, restaurants, and discos.

Other resorts in the Balkans, which the Post Office survey found to have a good value for money include Kopaonik in Serbia and Popova Sapka in Macedonia.

If you wish to insult somebody in Bulgarian, you could call him tikvenik – a word whose content isn’t quite clear, and which Bulgarians use to mean anything from ‘thickhead’ to ‘airhead’. The good thing about this kind of insult is that it expresses your definite lack of approval,

Like quicksand, poverty is hard to escape – the harder you fight, the worse it can get. In Skopje, some work hard scouring the city for „treasures.” They are bottle collectors, spending the day in search of recyclable plastic which they can sell for a subsistence income.

„Go and see it. It had me thinking about it for a long time” says Morelle Smith in her review of The Silence of Lorna.

Located roughly in the middle between Bulgaria’s Black Sea and Croatia’s Adriatic coasts, which are both shaken by high-energy rock parties each July, Novi Sad hosts one of the most significant summer festivals on the Balkans – EXIT. As fans from all parts of the region start to gather in the town for for this year’s event, scheduled to take place between July 10 and 13, Mila Popova recounts about the time she spent at the festival last summer.

In Homo Urbanus Europeanus, exhibited May 9-24 in front of the National Theatre in Sofia, Jean-Marc Caracci presents his photographs of people in the urban environment of European capitals.

RED&WHITE SOFIA. On the 1st of March Bulgarians say goodbye to the winter. They buy each other red&white threads to carry around until they see a stork and spring can begin. Photography by Lode Desmet

BULGARIA D’OR: The Bulgarian countryside, patinated with the noble golden dust of the autumn. Photographs by Lode Desmet

360 degrees Bulgaria, an exhibition by photographer Alexandar Ivanov, is on display at the Sea Garden in Varna until August 28. It will be shown at Plovdiv’s Central Square from Sept 5.

Read the article on Balkan Travelers

Bulgaria and Romania Offer Cheapest Skiing Holidays in Europe and North America

21 January 2010 Romania and Bulgaria are the two skiing destination where holidaymakers’ budgets will go furthest, according to the Post Office Travel Services Ski Resort Report 2009, which surveyed 14 ski resorts across Europe and North America.

The cost of skiing in Europe on the whole is one the rise, but Eastern Europe continues to offer excellent value, particularly for beginner and intermediate skiers and families on a tight budget, according to the report, which investigated the total costs of six days’ skiing – including ski pass, ski hire, meals, and drinks.

The survey found the Poiana Brasov resort in Romania as the best value-for-money destination, with the total costs of six days’ skiing coming to £195.76 (around 225 euro) per person. The natural setting of country’s most popular resorts, according to the publication, “has been compared to Chamonix, France and Cortina D’Ampezzo, Italy.” It warns that advanced skiers may find the pistes limiting, but points to the fact there are also nine kilometres of cross-country trails to explore and wide open pistes for beginners.

The second most affordable ski resort, according to the Post Office survey, is Borovets in Bulgaria, with the total costs for six days’ skiing amounting to £250.87 (around 290 euro) per person.

“Bulgaria offers great skiing possibilities in its resorts, especially for beginners or people still finding their feet on the piste. Excellent value for money and superb après ski for adults and children make it a great family destination,” Marion Telsnig from TUI Travel told the publication.

As Bulgaria’s oldest and largest ski resort, set at 1,300 metres in the Rila Mountains, Borovets is ideal for intermediates and beginners, although it is considered somewhat limited for expert skiers, Post Office wrote.

In addition to its attractive 58 kilometres of pistes, the publication noted that the resort offers a good choice of inexpensive, cheerful bars, pubs, restaurants, and discos.

Other resorts in the Balkans, which the Post Office survey found to have a good value for money include Kopaonik in Serbia and Popova Sapka in Macedonia.

If you wish to insult somebody in Bulgarian, you could call him tikvenik – a word whose content isn’t quite clear, and which Bulgarians use to mean anything from ‘thickhead’ to ‘airhead’. The good thing about this kind of insult is that it expresses your definite lack of approval,

Like quicksand, poverty is hard to escape – the harder you fight, the worse it can get. In Skopje, some work hard scouring the city for „treasures.” They are bottle collectors, spending the day in search of recyclable plastic which they can sell for a subsistence income.

„Go and see it. It had me thinking about it for a long time” says Morelle Smith in her review of The Silence of Lorna.

Located roughly in the middle between Bulgaria’s Black Sea and Croatia’s Adriatic coasts, which are both shaken by high-energy rock parties each July, Novi Sad hosts one of the most significant summer festivals on the Balkans – EXIT. As fans from all parts of the region start to gather in the town for for this year’s event, scheduled to take place between July 10 and 13, Mila Popova recounts about the time she spent at the festival last summer.

In Homo Urbanus Europeanus, exhibited May 9-24 in front of the National Theatre in Sofia, Jean-Marc Caracci presents his photographs of people in the urban environment of European capitals.

RED&WHITE SOFIA. On the 1st of March Bulgarians say goodbye to the winter. They buy each other red&white threads to carry around until they see a stork and spring can begin. Photography by Lode Desmet

BULGARIA D’OR: The Bulgarian countryside, patinated with the noble golden dust of the autumn. Photographs by Lode Desmet

360 degrees Bulgaria, an exhibition by photographer Alexandar Ivanov, is on display at the Sea Garden in Varna until August 28. It will be shown at Plovdiv’s Central Square from Sept 5.

Read the article on Balkan Travelers

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