ENGLAND went into the tournament in Mexico as World Cup holders — but it was Pele and the boys from Brazil who would emerge triumphant.

The two teams met in a group match that will live long in the memory. Bobby Moore made a succession of perfectly-timed tackles, keeper Gordon Banks denied Pele with the save of the century and Jeff Astle missed a sitter that would have earned the Three Lions a point.

In the end, a 60th-minute strike from Jairzinho — who would go on to score in every match in the tournament — gave Brazil victory but pundits predicted the teams would meet again in the final.

Sadly, it was not to be. After qualifying second in Group C courtesy of 1-0 wins over Romania and Czechoslovakia, England began three long-standing traditions — choking in quarter-finals, losing to the Germans and finding a scapegoat to blame afterwards.

Goals from Alan Mullery and Martin Peters gave them a 2-0 lead but Franz Beckenbauer and Uwe Seeler drew West Germany level before Gerd Muller grabbed a winner in extra-time.

Keeper Peter Bonetti — standing in for the injured Gordon Banks — got most of the blame, while boss Alf Ramsey’s decision to substitute Bobby Charlton with 20 minutes left was also heavily criticised.

West Germany went on to meet Italy in a thrilling semi-final. A Roberto Boninsegna goal looked like sending Italy through until Karl-Heinz Schnellinger snatched a last-gasp equaliser.

Five more goals were scored in extra-time, with Muller’s brace not enough to prevent a 4-3 victory for Italy.

Brazil, meanwhile, had cruised past Peru 4-2 in the quarter-finals and beat Uruguay 3-1 in the last four to set up a final clash with Italy.

Pele rose like a salmon to head Brazil into an early lead in Mexico City only for Boninsegna to equalise for the Azzurri before the break.

But second-half goals from Gerson, Jairzinho and — rounding off a superb passing move — Carlos Alberto saw Brazil claim their third World Cup.

Watch highlights of the 1970 World Cup by clicking on the graphic below.

Read the article on The Sun

World Cup 1970 review

ENGLAND went into the tournament in Mexico as World Cup holders — but it was Pele and the boys from Brazil who would emerge triumphant.

The two teams met in a group match that will live long in the memory. Bobby Moore made a succession of perfectly-timed tackles, keeper Gordon Banks denied Pele with the save of the century and Jeff Astle missed a sitter that would have earned the Three Lions a point.

In the end, a 60th-minute strike from Jairzinho — who would go on to score in every match in the tournament — gave Brazil victory but pundits predicted the teams would meet again in the final.

Sadly, it was not to be. After qualifying second in Group C courtesy of 1-0 wins over Romania and Czechoslovakia, England began three long-standing traditions — choking in quarter-finals, losing to the Germans and finding a scapegoat to blame afterwards.

Goals from Alan Mullery and Martin Peters gave them a 2-0 lead but Franz Beckenbauer and Uwe Seeler drew West Germany level before Gerd Muller grabbed a winner in extra-time.

Keeper Peter Bonetti — standing in for the injured Gordon Banks — got most of the blame, while boss Alf Ramsey’s decision to substitute Bobby Charlton with 20 minutes left was also heavily criticised.

West Germany went on to meet Italy in a thrilling semi-final. A Roberto Boninsegna goal looked like sending Italy through until Karl-Heinz Schnellinger snatched a last-gasp equaliser.

Five more goals were scored in extra-time, with Muller’s brace not enough to prevent a 4-3 victory for Italy.

Brazil, meanwhile, had cruised past Peru 4-2 in the quarter-finals and beat Uruguay 3-1 in the last four to set up a final clash with Italy.

Pele rose like a salmon to head Brazil into an early lead in Mexico City only for Boninsegna to equalise for the Azzurri before the break.

But second-half goals from Gerson, Jairzinho and — rounding off a superb passing move — Carlos Alberto saw Brazil claim their third World Cup.

Watch highlights of the 1970 World Cup by clicking on the graphic below.

Read the article on The Sun

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